Digital Technology Investigations Unit

The Digital Technology Investigations Unit is responsible for conducting investigations of offenders that utilize computers and computer technology for the purpose of exploiting children. The Unit conducts proactive and reactive investigations into endangerment of children. These cases most often come in the form of child pornography or luring of a child. The Unit is designated as the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC) for the State of New Jersey. Unit members conduct investigations, provide investigative assistance to other law enforcement agencies, conduct computer forensic services in the field, and provide public awareness through internet safety lectures to adults and youth.

Contact the Digital Technology Investigations Unit
(609) 584-5051 ext 5624


The Digital Technology Investigations Unit was originally named the High Technology Crimes and Investigative Support Unit. During late 1996, and officially in January 1997, the New Jersey State Police gathered a group of investigators who had an aptitude for computers. They were provided specialized training and began conducting investigations. They were the first unit in the State of New Jersey to specialize in computer investigations and one of only a handful across the United States. The unit was responsible for conducting investigations into all crimes that utilized computers, computer technology, and telecommunications and that knowledge of computer technology was essential for the perpetration, investigation or prosecution. They were also the only unit conducting computer forensics in the State.

As internet usage within the state increased, the unit received a corresponding increase in complaints. The number of child endangerment, internet fraud, and computer intrusion cases increased to the point that it was determined that multiple units were necessary to increase the efficiency of the investigative response. In May of 2004 the Cyber-Crimes Unit created to investigate computer intrusions, virus, and fraud. The High Technology Crimes Unit was renamed the Digital Technology Investigations Unit and dedicated to child exploitation on the internet.


Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC)

The ICAC Task Force Program was created to help State and local law enforcement agencies enhance their investigative response to offenders who use the Internet, online communication systems, or other computer technology to sexually exploit children. The program is currently composed of 46 regional Task Force agencies and is funded by the United States Department of Justice, Office Of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

To contact a Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force outside New Jersey

http://www.icactraining.org/TF_Contacts.htm


How to report a crime or suspicious incident involving children

If you wish to report an instance of child endangerment and the suspect or victim lives in the State of New Jersey, please utilize the Computer Crimes Task Force Hotline
1-888-648-6007

If you wish to report an instance of child endangerment utilizing a web reporting system or you are unsure as to the location of the child, please utilize the CyberTipline Reporting System Sponsored by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children http://www.ncmec.org

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) acts as a clearinghouse of information received from various sources and distributed to law enforcement. The New Jersey State Police is an Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force and receives all Cybertips linked to New Jersey.


Internet Safety Tips

The New Jersey State Police is dedicated to the safety of everyone utilizing the internet. The following rules are suggested by The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and endorsed by the New Jersey State Police.

Internet Safety Tips for Kids

  1. I will not give out personal information such as my address, telephone number, parents' work address/telephone number, or the name and location of my school without my parents' permission.
  2. I will tell my parents right away if I come across any information that makes me feel uncomfortable.
  3. I will never agree to get together with someone that I "meet" online without first checking with my parents. If my parents agree to the meeting, I will be sure that it is in a public place and bring my mother or father along.
  4. I will never send a person my picture or anything else without first checking with my parents.
  5. I will not respond to any messages that are mean or in any way make me feel uncomfortable. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do, I will tell my parents right away so that they can contact the online service.
  6. I will talk with my parents so that we can set up rules for going online. We will decide upon the time of day that I can be online, the length of time I can be online, and appropriate areas for me to visit. I will not access other areas or break these rules without their permission.

Adapted from Child Safety on the Information Highway by Lawrence J. Magid. Copyright 1994 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). All rights reserved.


Internet-Related Safety Tips for Teens

  1. Don’t give out personal information about yourself, your family situation, your school, your telephone number, or your address.
  2. If you become aware of the sharing, use, or viewing of child pornography on line, immediately report this to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678.
  3. When in chat rooms remember that not everyone may be who they say they are. For example a person who says "she" is a 14-year-old girl from New York may really be a 42-year-old man from California.1
  4. If someone harasses you online, says anything inappropriate, or does anything that makes you feel uncomfortable, contact your Internet service provider.
  5. Know that there are rules many Internet Service Providers (ISP) have about online behavior. If you disobey an ISP's rules, your ISP may penalize you by disabling your account, and sometimes every account in a household, either temporarily or permanently.
  6. Consider volunteering at your local library, school, or Boys & Girls Club to help younger children online. Many schools and nonprofit organizations are in need of people to help set up their computers and Internet capabilities.
  7. A friend you meet online may not be the best person to talk to if you are having problems at home, with your friends, or at school - remember the teenage "girl" from New York in Tip number three? If you can't find an adult in your school, church, club, or neighborhood to talk to, Covenant House is a good place to call at 1-800-999-9999. The people there provide counseling to kids, refer them to local shelters, help them with law enforcement, and can serve as mediators by calling their parents.
  8. If you are thinking about running away, a friend from online (remember the 14-year-old girl) may not be the best person to talk to. If there is no adult in your community you can find to talk to, call the National Runaway Switchboard at 1-800-621-4000. Although some of your online friends may seem to really listen to you, the Switchboard will be able to give you honest, useful answers to some of your questions about what to do when you are depressed, abused, or thinking about running away.2

1 Adapted from Teen Safety on the Information Highway by Lawrence J. Magid. Copyright respectively 1994 and 1998 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). All rights reserved.

2 Adapted from Children Online: The ABCs for Parenting: When Is Your Child Ready by The Children's Partnership. Reprinted with permission of The Children's Partnership. http://www.childrenspartnership.org

Additional information can be obtained from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at www.ncmec.org or at www.netsmartz.org.


Request for Internet Safety Lecture

To request a presentation for your group please utilize the following email address:
hitech@gw.njsp.org

Include in your subject line “Lecture Request”
Please include in your email:

  1. Location.
  2. Type of Group .
  3. Age of group (we have presentations for adult, teenager and middle school).
  4. Provide a date (several dates are better for scheduling).
  5. Any special subject matter that you would like covered.
  6. Your contact information.

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